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Veterans’ Tales by Vassar Bushmills

(Courtesy of our Vietnam War combat vet, Mike Collins, this is how my Dad got home in ’45.)

The U.S. military experienced an unimaginable increase during World War II. In 1939, there were 334,000 servicemen, not counting the  Coast Guard. In 1945, there were over 12 million, including the Coast Guard. At the end of the war, over 8 million of these men and women
were scattered overseas in Europe, the Pacific and Asia.

Shipping them out wasn’t a particular problem but getting them home was a massive logistical headache. The problem didn’t come as a surprise, as Army Chief of Staff General George C. Marshall had already established committees to address the issue in 1943.

Taylor in August 1945 (Wikimedia Commons)
Soldiers returning home on the USS General Harry Taylor in August 1945 (Wikimedia Commons)

When Germany fell in May 1945, the U.S. Navy was still busy fighting in the Pacific and couldn’t assist. The job of transporting 3 million men home fell to the Army and the Merchant Marine. 300 Victory and Liberty cargo ships were converted to troop transports for the task. During the war, 148,000 troops crossed the Atlantic west to east each month; the rush home ramped this up to 435,000 a month over 14 months.

Hammocks in hangar of USS Intrepid (CV-11) during Magic Carpet c1945 Source: Wikimedia Commons
Hammocks in hangar of USS Intrepid (CV-11) during Magic Carpet c1945 (Wikimedia Commons)

In October 1945, with the war in Asia also over, the Navy started chipping in, converting all available vessels to transport duty. On smaller ships like destroyers, capable of carrying perhaps 300 men, soldiers were told to hang their hammocks in whatever nook and cranny they could find. Carriers were particularly useful, as their large open hangar decks could house 3,000 or more troops in relative comfort, with bunks, sometimes in stacks of five welded or bolted in place.

Bunks aboard the Army transport SS Pennant (Source: Wikimedia Commons)

The Navy wasn’t picky, though: cruisers, battleships, hospital ships, even LSTs (Landing Ship, Tank) were packed full of men yearning for home. Two British ocean liners under American control, the RMS Queen Mary and Queen Elizabeth, had already served as troop transports before and continued to do so during the operation, each capable of carrying up to 15,000 people at a time, though their normal,  peacetime capacity was less than 2,200. Twenty-nine ships were dedicated to transporting war brides: women married to American soldiers during the war[…]

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